slabbb-blockkk-hilarious:

Chimaera 
This image provided by NOAA shows a deep-sea  chimaera. Chimaeras are most closely related to sharks, although their  evolutionary lineage branched off from sharks nearly 400m years ago, and  they have remained an isolated group ever since. According to  scientists the lateral lines running across this chimaera are  mechano-receptors that detect pressure waves (just like ears). The  dotted-looking lines on the frontal portion of the face (near the mouth)  are ampullae de lorenzini and they detect perturbations in electrical  fields generated by living organisms. Scientists using cutting-edge  technology to explore waters off Indonesia predicted that as many as 40  new plant and animal species may have been discovered during a  three-week expedition 
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2010/dec/25/new-species-discovered-2010#/?picture=369998923&index=0

Creatures from the pitch black depth of the ocean fascinate. They are like creatures from another planet.

slabbb-blockkk-hilarious:

Chimaera

This image provided by NOAA shows a deep-sea chimaera. Chimaeras are most closely related to sharks, although their evolutionary lineage branched off from sharks nearly 400m years ago, and they have remained an isolated group ever since. According to scientists the lateral lines running across this chimaera are mechano-receptors that detect pressure waves (just like ears). The dotted-looking lines on the frontal portion of the face (near the mouth) are ampullae de lorenzini and they detect perturbations in electrical fields generated by living organisms. Scientists using cutting-edge technology to explore waters off Indonesia predicted that as many as 40 new plant and animal species may have been discovered during a three-week expedition

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2010/dec/25/new-species-discovered-2010#/?picture=369998923&index=0

Creatures from the pitch black depth of the ocean fascinate. They are like creatures from another planet.